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Jinsey guest speaker at Backstage event

Posted by on 12:54 pm in Headshots, Recent Features | Comments Off on Jinsey guest speaker at Backstage event

Jinsey guest speaker at Backstage event

Meet a Top Casting Director, Manager, and Photographer. Get Invited to More Auditions by Improving Your Resume. Your headshot and résumé are your calling cards. A top-shelf photographer, manager, and casting director offer advice on getting the right shot and putting together the perfect résumé. Bring your current headshots and résumé for evaluation by these experts. Jinsey Dauk, Photographer Jinsey Dauk has been a headshot photographer in NYC for 25 years. An actor and a former Ford model, she studied and then taught photography at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C. She collaborated with designer Vera Wang on the book “Vera Wang on Weddings,” and her work has been featured in Modern Bride; Playbill; Back Stage; New Canaan, Darien & Rowayton Magazine; and Photo District News, as well as in galleries and private collections around the world. She has modeled in Paris, Milan, London, Hamburg, and Munich and appeared in more than 60 commercials, including Coca-Cola, Nestlé’s Quik, Red Lobster, Aquafresh, Dimetapp, Easy-Off, and Palmolive. She believes in using natural light rather than flash in order to put actors at their ease and relies on up-to-date feedback from the casting directors and managers who recommend...

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Backstage: New York Photographer on what makes an effective headshot

Posted by on 12:42 pm in Headshots, Recent Features | Comments Off on Backstage: New York Photographer on what makes an effective headshot

Backstage: New York Photographer on what makes an effective headshot

Jinsey was recently featured in an article from Backstage magazine about New York headshot photographers. It’s all in the eyes! Here in their headshots, actors Rhonda Jensen and Miguel Perez are both open, approachable, warm, and engaging. They emit a spirit, a personality, and a feeling. That’s exactly what you want in a headshot—you want the casting director to feel all that. Because I shoot with natural light and not flash, it’s easy for clients to feel more natural themselves; they are spontaneous and being, not posing. Their eyes are alive. Casting directors and agents like this because not only do the actors look like their headshots, but the CDs and agents get a sense of communication and honesty. Regarding the background, I always keep it out of focus to help the subjects become more three-dimensional, as if they’re jumping off the page. Regarding the clothing, I prefer that we keep the shot simple by going with mostly solid-colored clothing. That makes the eyes the most important thing in the shot. People feel they almost know these actors just by looking into their eyes. That’s the kind of connection to strive for in a...

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Photoshoot for New York City based psychologist

Posted by on 11:00 am in Headshots, Recent Features | Comments Off on Photoshoot for New York City based psychologist

Photoshoot for New York City based psychologist

Dr. Erin Walker, PhD www.erinwalkerphd.com Jinsey recently completed a photoshoot for a New York City based psychologist, Dr. Erin Walker, who specializes in psychotherapy for individuals, couples and families. The photos will be used on her new website and needed to portray her as professional, approachable and...

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Jinsey Dauk Fine Art Photography

Posted by on 4:58 pm in Recent Features | Comments Off on Jinsey Dauk Fine Art Photography

Jinsey Dauk Fine Art Photography

Click here to visit Jinsey’s fine art website If you’ve ever wondered what a bee sees when he’s buried deep within the folds of a flower, surrounded by color and bemused by fragrance, then you shouldn’t miss the fine art photography of Jinsey Dauk. An artist with an eye for the smallest of sensuous details, Jinsey uses a camera to capture what’s most miraculous about life. Then she presents her vision to all of us who are hurrying past a frisson of flowers or a riot of raindrops without really seeing them at all. Jinsey’s love for photography began early. As a very young girl, when a friend of her mother’s became ill with leukemia, she picked up a Minolta camera for the first time to take pictures of the woman’s son. An innate talent for seeing the world in striking detail was quickly apparent. Jinsey captured the boy leaping with a basketball in his hands, sunlight in his eyes, and his mother posted the photos around her hospital room. Soon visitors and friends were asking who took the photos, and her career began, first by taking black and white portraits of children for whom she babysat. Fast forward a couple of decades. Jinsey spent time working as a Ford and Elite model, then launched a career as a documentary-style wedding and portrait photographer, primarily in black and white, before turning her camera toward the beauty of nature in full, glorious color.     Once again, serendipity intervened in her life. She began simply, by photographing flower arrangements on the sunlit windowsills of her Tribeca apartment to thank the friends who had sent them; before long, those friends were insisting she create large-scale art pieces and offer them for sale. From that point, she branched out into shooting more than flowers, and she quickly gained a following.   Today, Jinsey’s work is available as metallic prints, without frames, pressed under a quarter inch of plexiglass. Although many collectors prefer the large version, and collect them as diptychs, triptychs or quadtychs, (sometimes even as a series of six), Jinsey happily custom-sizes her pieces to fit a particular space in home, office or boutique hotels. She is also happy to work on commissioned pieces and will travel to photograph whatever a client chooses, whether it’s a beloved rose garden or another cherished item. Using macro lenses and micro filters from the 1960s and blending those techniques with today’s sophisticated digital technology is how she creates her work, but it doesn’t begin to explain her vision. She describes her first foray into photographing flowers as a journey she undertook, albeit one with camera in hand. “I traveled through those flowers and ferns and bouquets, traveled through a whole different universe. Each turn of my focusing ring was escaping into another world,” she says. “Photography changes me. It’s a private experience. I’m six foot one, but in this world I’m all scrunched down, into something the size of a thumbnail. Every single one of my senses gets touched upon when I photograph something. I hope that viewers of my work will have the same experience.” Jinsey grew up in Rowayton and Darien, Connecticut. Her mother still lives in Darien, in a matriarchal home owned first by her mother’s grandmother, then her mother’s mother,...

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Jinsey’s two minute helpful headshot info video

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Jinsey’s two minute helpful headshot info video

Jinsey and a few of her clients explain her process and what set Jinsey’s photography apart from the rest!

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Jinsey Featured in National Bridal Publications

Posted by on 9:08 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on Jinsey Featured in National Bridal Publications

Jinsey Featured in National Bridal Publications

Jinsey’s wedding photography has been featured in numerous National bridal publications, view a selection of images below. Contact Jinsey for more information about her wedding...

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Inside Edition features Jinsey’s internet dating headshots

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Inside Edition features Jinsey’s internet dating headshots

Inside Edition, the long-running television newsmagazine program on CBS, presented a segment about the popularity of online dating and how some users are having professional headshot photos taken to create a more successful online profile. Jinsey is interviewed as a photographer who specializes in headshots and has taken many effective shots for numerous clients to portray them in flattering natural light and improve their chances of finding romance...

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New York Magazine features Jinsey’s internet dating headshots

Posted by on 11:58 am in Headshots, Recent Features | Comments Off on New York Magazine features Jinsey’s internet dating headshots

New York Magazine features Jinsey’s internet dating headshots

  If your Match.com date looks better onscreen than in life, here’s why When the first calls came in, says Jinsey Dauk, a photographer known for natural-light head shots of actors, she was puzzled. The clients were “sort of vague,” she says, about why they needed portraits. Eventually, the truth emerged: They wanted flattering photos for their Internet dating ads. Since then, says Dauk, it’s turned into steady work, primarily from professionals in their thirties and forties. “We mostly do big-smile shots—Here I am! Not so much come-hither. I guess they save that for in-person.” Dauk says she’s shot more than 50 in recent months (at $850 per head, or $650 if they come through her website). And even a cursory look at Match.com reveals far more obviously professional photos than, say, a year ago. Does it work? Ask John (first name only, he pleads), who posted an ad with a run-of-the-mill snapshot, then took the plunge and hired Dauk. The difference was “dramatic,” he says. “I got ten times as many responses.” Published in New York Magazine By Christopher...

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Kimberly & James: A Touch of Joy in a Wounded New York City

Posted by on 8:50 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on Kimberly & James: A Touch of Joy in a Wounded New York City

Kimberly & James: A Touch of Joy in a Wounded New York City

Kim and Jim took the days before their September 15 wedding off from work. They planned to run last-minute errands, check in with their vendors, and savor the delicious anticipation of the upcoming event. On the morning of September 11, four days before the wedding, the two were watching the morning news when the scene of destruction occurring just downtown unfolded horribly before them. After two days of panic, fear, and frantic calls to the couple’s many friends who work in the financial district of Manhattan, the two realized that they had suffered an unspeakable loss. James “Jimmy” Straine Jr., a friend of Jim’s for 17 years, an employee of Cantor Fitzgerald, and a groomsman in the upcoming wedding, was among those missing. While dealing with their grief, the couple needed to deal with another issue. The wedding was in two days, and they had a decision to make: Could they, and should they, go forward with their plans to tie the knot? THE BRIDE Kimberly Magioncalda, 24, an employee at Credit Suisse First Boston in the Equity Capital Markets Group THE GROOM James O’Hoppe, 36, managing director at 360 Networks THE DATE September 15, 2001 THE SCENE Ceremony at St. Thomas More Church; reception at The Mark hotel; both on Manhattan’s Upper East Side HOW THEY MET Kim, fresh from college, was working at the Ralph Lauren store in a mansion on 72nd Street and Madison Avenue. Jim stopped in to buy a tuxedo, and Kim helped him out. “We talked for almost an hour,” laughs Kim, “about almost everything but that tuxedo.” In fact, Jim left the store with only a tuxedo shirt. But what he also left with was Kim’s phone number. THE PROPOSAL Just over one year after their first date, Jim invited Kim along to a cocktail party that didn’t actually exist. He had, in fact, stopped in at the Ralph Lauren boutique where the two had had their first fateful meeting, and asked for the staff’s help in planning a marriage proposal. On the way to the “cocktail party,” Jim lured Kim into the store by claiming that they were running early and that he needed a pair of loafers, anyway. As they walked past the manager, Jim secretly handed off the ring in its blue Tiffany box. After pretending to admire a few pairs of shoes in the nearly empty store, Jim announced it was time to go and walked past the estate jewelry counter. “Look, Kim,” he pointed out, “look at that engagement ring in the jewelry display.” Kim admired the lovely ring, and Jim asked the manager why it was there. The manager, answering Jim’s question, explained that the ring was for “a very special couple, named Kim and Jim, who had met in the store about one year ago.” Then Jim took the very surprised and delighted Kim over to a quiet corner chair, got down on one knee, and proposed marriage. Kim exclaimed an enthusiastic “yes!” and the couple turned to see the staircase behind them lined with women who worked in the store, all happily sniffling. The couple next headed for the rooftop of the Peninsula, where they shared a champagne toast with the parents of the bride-to-be. THE PLANNING “A New York city wedding is a...

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Jinsey in Modern Bride Magazine

Posted by on 8:36 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on Jinsey in Modern Bride Magazine

Jinsey in Modern Bride Magazine

Have no fear, help is here! You’ve got photography questions, we’ve got the expert to answer them. JINSEY DAUK, a professional shutterbug in New York City, takes a shot at your most pressing concerns. How much pre‑wedding prep do I need to do? What kind of things should I tell my photographer before the big day? It is important that you and your photographer are on the same wavelength, so sit down with her to have what I call a creative meeting about a week before the wedding. Cover points like timing issues (how early he or she should start shooting, when you plan to take formal portraits, how long photo sessions should last, etc.); family problems (“Watch out for Uncle Bill who doesn’t quite get along with Aunt Betty,” etc.); creative ideas (interesting backgrounds, props, nostalgic or modern shots); and any details you do or do not want to highlight (an heirloom cake knife, your groom’s bald spot). You’ll feel fully prepped knowing you went over everything point by point. How can I make myself look picture perfect? How can we be sure we don’t end up with red eye in our photos? And how can I prevent that shiny look under the lights? You wouldn’t believe how many of my brides worry about this stuff. But trust me, you don’t have to! For the shiny face, that’s easy: I always carry face powder for my brides. Your photographer may not, so throw some in your purse for quick touch‑ups during the portraits. If you’re getting down on the dance floor, don’t stress that the photographer is taking candids as you sweat. In the film, you’ll probably look like you’re glowing! As for red eye, every professional photographer knows how to avoid it with lighting and special film‑that’s why they carry around all that expensive stuff. But if you end up with red eyes in your proofs tell your photographer to make sure he corrects them in any prints you select.   Do we need to spring for a photographer’s assistant? Is an assistant necessary? Our photographer wants to bring one. My answer is yes! Some assistants just carry heavy equipment, which frees up the main photographer. The less grunt work, the more she can focus on getting the best photos. Sometimes a photographer will bring a shooting assistant instead, who can catch shots that the photographer might miss, or snap formal portraits while the photographer takes candids. As long as the photographer remains in control, assistants can be extremely valuable. After all, your photographer needs to be efficient, organized and quick.   I’m bummed! We can’t take ceremony shots. My friends weren’t allowed to have pictures taken during the ceremony, so they had to fake the ring exchange in pictures taken afterwards. They came out so cheesy. Our officiant just told us we’ll have to do the same. What are our options? You might be surprised by what your officiant says if you ask her to bend the rules. Even if she stands firm, she might be willing to help you out by offering you options like taking shots without the flash, which some photographers prefer during those moments, or allowing the photographer to stand in an inconspicuous spot on the sidelines. But if the rules are...

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