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Jinsey’s wedding
photography is special

She shoots both color and black & white images. “I love the nostalgia and timelessness of black & white photography, I love, love, love black & white! I’m also sure to shoot lots of color! After all it is a wedding filled with flowers, food, love and life!” Couples who have shot with Jinsey love the fact that she is able to take advantage of existing and natural light, whether indoors or outdoors. “There is a wonderful environmental feel to our pictures – a realistic filmic quality,” one client wrote.

Her shoot is as individual as the wedding itself, creating a free and improvisational atmosphere. That way your special day is preserved as it was with hardly any interference by obtrusive flashbulbs. Another client wrote, “The formal poses were actually fun, thanks to your relaxed and friendly, but well organized approach.” With a happy and efficient method, family pictures can be taken quickly, so as not to get in the way of the festivities, but to preserve images that everyone will enjoy in the years to come!

 

“You don’t see the things you photograph. You feel them!”
Andre Kertesz

Articles featuring Jinsey’s Wedding Photography

Jinsey Featured in National Bridal Publications

Posted by on 9:08 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on Jinsey Featured in National Bridal Publications

Jinsey Featured in National Bridal Publications

Jinsey’s wedding photography has been featured in numerous National bridal publications, view a selection of images below. Contact Jinsey for more information about her wedding...

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Kimberly & James: A Touch of Joy in a Wounded New York City

Posted by on 8:50 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on Kimberly & James: A Touch of Joy in a Wounded New York City

Kimberly & James: A Touch of Joy in a Wounded New York City

Kim and Jim took the days before their September 15 wedding off from work. They planned to run last-minute errands, check in with their vendors, and savor the delicious anticipation of the upcoming event. On the morning of September 11, four days before the wedding, the two were watching the morning news when the scene of destruction occurring just downtown unfolded horribly before them. After two days of panic, fear, and frantic calls to the couple’s many friends who work in the financial district of Manhattan, the two realized that they had suffered an unspeakable loss. James “Jimmy” Straine Jr., a friend of Jim’s for 17 years, an employee of Cantor Fitzgerald, and a groomsman in the upcoming wedding, was among those missing. While dealing with their grief, the couple needed to deal with another issue. The wedding was in two days, and they had a decision to make: Could they, and should they, go forward with their plans to tie the knot? THE BRIDE Kimberly Magioncalda, 24, an employee at Credit Suisse First Boston in the Equity Capital Markets Group THE GROOM James O’Hoppe, 36, managing director at 360 Networks THE DATE September 15, 2001 THE SCENE Ceremony at St. Thomas More Church; reception at The Mark hotel; both on Manhattan’s Upper East Side HOW THEY MET Kim, fresh from college, was working at the Ralph Lauren store in a mansion on 72nd Street and Madison Avenue. Jim stopped in to buy a tuxedo, and Kim helped him out. “We talked for almost an hour,” laughs Kim, “about almost everything but that tuxedo.” In fact, Jim left the store with only a tuxedo shirt. But what he also left with was Kim’s phone number. THE PROPOSAL Just over one year after their first date, Jim invited Kim along to a cocktail party that didn’t actually exist. He had, in fact, stopped in at the Ralph Lauren boutique where the two had had their first fateful meeting, and asked for the staff’s help in planning a marriage proposal. On the way to the “cocktail party,” Jim lured Kim into the store by claiming that they were running early and that he needed a pair of loafers, anyway. As they walked past the manager, Jim secretly handed off the ring in its blue Tiffany box. After pretending to admire a few pairs of shoes in the nearly empty store, Jim announced it was time to go and walked past the estate jewelry counter. “Look, Kim,” he pointed out, “look at that engagement ring in the jewelry display.” Kim admired the lovely ring, and Jim asked the manager why it was there. The manager, answering Jim’s question, explained that the ring was for “a very special couple, named Kim and Jim, who had met in the store about one year ago.” Then Jim took the very surprised and delighted Kim over to a quiet corner chair, got down on one knee, and proposed marriage. Kim exclaimed an enthusiastic “yes!” and the couple turned to see the staircase behind them lined with women who worked in the store, all happily sniffling. The couple next headed for the rooftop of the Peninsula, where they shared a champagne toast with the parents of the bride-to-be. THE PLANNING “A New York city wedding is a...

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Jinsey in Modern Bride Magazine

Posted by on 8:36 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on Jinsey in Modern Bride Magazine

Jinsey in Modern Bride Magazine

Have no fear, help is here! You’ve got photography questions, we’ve got the expert to answer them. JINSEY DAUK, a professional shutterbug in New York City, takes a shot at your most pressing concerns. How much pre‑wedding prep do I need to do? What kind of things should I tell my photographer before the big day? It is important that you and your photographer are on the same wavelength, so sit down with her to have what I call a creative meeting about a week before the wedding. Cover points like timing issues (how early he or she should start shooting, when you plan to take formal portraits, how long photo sessions should last, etc.); family problems (“Watch out for Uncle Bill who doesn’t quite get along with Aunt Betty,” etc.); creative ideas (interesting backgrounds, props, nostalgic or modern shots); and any details you do or do not want to highlight (an heirloom cake knife, your groom’s bald spot). You’ll feel fully prepped knowing you went over everything point by point. How can I make myself look picture perfect? How can we be sure we don’t end up with red eye in our photos? And how can I prevent that shiny look under the lights? You wouldn’t believe how many of my brides worry about this stuff. But trust me, you don’t have to! For the shiny face, that’s easy: I always carry face powder for my brides. Your photographer may not, so throw some in your purse for quick touch‑ups during the portraits. If you’re getting down on the dance floor, don’t stress that the photographer is taking candids as you sweat. In the film, you’ll probably look like you’re glowing! As for red eye, every professional photographer knows how to avoid it with lighting and special film‑that’s why they carry around all that expensive stuff. But if you end up with red eyes in your proofs tell your photographer to make sure he corrects them in any prints you select.   Do we need to spring for a photographer’s assistant? Is an assistant necessary? Our photographer wants to bring one. My answer is yes! Some assistants just carry heavy equipment, which frees up the main photographer. The less grunt work, the more she can focus on getting the best photos. Sometimes a photographer will bring a shooting assistant instead, who can catch shots that the photographer might miss, or snap formal portraits while the photographer takes candids. As long as the photographer remains in control, assistants can be extremely valuable. After all, your photographer needs to be efficient, organized and quick.   I’m bummed! We can’t take ceremony shots. My friends weren’t allowed to have pictures taken during the ceremony, so they had to fake the ring exchange in pictures taken afterwards. They came out so cheesy. Our officiant just told us we’ll have to do the same. What are our options? You might be surprised by what your officiant says if you ask her to bend the rules. Even if she stands firm, she might be willing to help you out by offering you options like taking shots without the flash, which some photographers prefer during those moments, or allowing the photographer to stand in an inconspicuous spot on the sidelines. But if the rules are...

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How to snap up a great photographer

Posted by on 11:07 am in Recent Features, Weddings | Comments Off on How to snap up a great photographer

How to snap up a great photographer

From Bride Magazine Excerpt from article: New York Photographer Jinsey Dauk also favors a loose documentary style, and uses natural lighting as opposed to strobes or flashes whenever possible. “It makes the photographs looks more authentic,” explains Dauk, who takes about 1,800 shots during the course of a wedding. “Then after a post-wedding consultation with the couple, i whittle that number down to an amount that works for them. Those are the shots I present to them in an...

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